Spring! The perfect weather for sauerkraut!

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This years long awaited Spring has properly arrived at last! My cherry tree is covering the garden in drifts of pink blossom,  every inch of the green house is packed with little seedlings  bursting from their pots and I did yoga in the sunshine for the first time this year with bumble bees buzzing and hens pecking my toes!

Everyone needs all the energy they can get when the days suddenly stretch out and we find ourselves moving so much more than even a few weeks ago.

Keeping our digestion happy and efficient is a way of helping stamina. And fermented foods are a great (and fun) way of doing this. Sauerkraut is an amazing food, naturally fermented, live and zingy and packed with easily available vitamins and minerals made accessible by the fermentation process.

Today I had the first try of a sauerkraut I made with cabbage and fennel. It was a couple of weeks old and was just perfect; refreshing and tasty.

I adapted a recipe from the wonderfully named Sandor Katz‘s book ‘Basic Fermentation

So here’s what I did;

I used one dense, white cabbage which weighed about 750 g

I grated the whole cabbage including the heart (you could finely chop it instead, and next time I’ll mix red and white cabbage to make a pink sauerkraut!).

As I grated it I mixed in a heaped desert spoon of sea salt and a handful of fennel seeds.

The salt makes the cabbage start sweating straight away and creates the brine in which the cabbage can ferment and sour without rotting. Apparently, Sandor says it’s possible to use ground kelp instead of salt and I’ll try this next time).

I packed the kraut down really firmly into a basin, (the pressing down packs the kraut into the basin and starts forcing water out of the cabbage), then pushed down on top of it another similar basin filled with water to give it weight.

I covered the whole lot with a tea towel to keep dust out and left it like that for a couple of weeks in the kitchen. The warmer weather (or warm kitchen) helps get the fermenting going as microbes love a bit of warmth!

I found that my cabbage had enough moisture in it not to need to add any water, but you could add a little to keep the cabbage below the surface or the brine if you liked.

The fennel is a digestive aid and also made the sauerkraut particularly tasty!

Have a go! Shop bought sauerkraut is expensive, salty and usually  killed off too, which gets rid of its main benefit!

 

 

Summer Heat

A photograph of a pile of watermelon wit.h a halved one on top

I’m quite torn this evening about which topic to write about; it has to be either heat (for obvious reasons if you live in the UK and are sweltering in our first Summer for years!) or what to do with bumps and bruises.

The latter topic is close to my heart because at the weekend I had a fall from a lovely horse that I was riding. It wasn’t the horses fault at all and I wasn’t badly hurt at all, but I was quarter way through the best riding that I’ve ever done in my life and determined to make sure that I could carry on!

Hmmm….

I’ll start with heat because, even though I think the clouds are building after a month of non-stop sunshine, it looks like it’s going to stay warm for a while.

And, of course, I don’t imagine I’m going to have many more opportunities to write about Heat in the near future up here in the Lake District!

As always, Chinese Medicine has a whole range of views about Heat; there’s humid or Damp Heat and Dry Heat for example, which are quite different challenges, and all types of Heat can be treated with acupuncture, Herbs, lifestyle changes or dietary adaptations.

When it comes to foods that help different conditions, Daverick Leggett has written a couple of excellent books. He lists different foods which alleviate different conditions in his book Helping Ourselves. You’d need to get a TCM practitioner to tell you what your conditions were to work in this way as Chinese Medicine diagnosis is a real art and nothing is ever as clear as it seems from a laypersons point of view.

Daverick’s other book, Recipes for Self Healing, gives recipes based on the different properties of different foods.

In TCM there isn’t the view that we take in the West (on the whole) that certain foods are healthy and others are unhealthy. More that certain foods are more appropriate for certain conditions. An additional complexity would then be that those conditions would be very varied. For example a season would bring one set of conditions, the weather on a certain day would involve another layer of consideration, and a persons own internal pathology and lifestyle choices would need to be weighed up too.

So saying, if your digestion is reasonably ok and the weather is consistently hot then great coolers and thirst quenchers are water melon, cucumber, lettuce and peppermint and elderflower.

Yum! You could just throw some, or all, of those together, blend them, and drink! Leave out ice if you can resist it and just let the natural coolness of those ingredients do their work!

So it looks like it’ll be the turn of treating bumps and bruises next time!